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 Posted: Mon Sep 20th, 2010 11:16 am
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WilmSurv
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What would be causing intermittent pressure spikes in my water line? The water authority indicates the pressure should be consistent, yet at various times the pressure will spike to over 100psi and then drop to 65 psi... I am testing the pressure on an outside tap. It spikes at least once during the night and sporadically during the day. During the day could it be an appliance issue? Recently installed an expansion tank. In the past 3 years went from a well to county water and within the year removed the water softener as the County now treats the water....started getting water from the T&P which prompted the installation of the tank.:(

Last edited on Mon Sep 20th, 2010 11:18 am by WilmSurv

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 Posted: Mon Sep 20th, 2010 01:27 pm
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energyexpert
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The equation as to what causes pressures spikes could be very complex: Number of pumps and type of control on county system, number of large water uses and how fast they start and stop usage, etc.  The answer will be a pressure regulator install in the first available place where the water enters your house.

David

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 Posted: Mon Sep 20th, 2010 06:13 pm
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elenano
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WilmSurv, you asked this exact question three or four days ago and David answered you the same way. Nobody else added anything because his is the correct answer. Now you need to implement it.

Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Mon Sep 20th, 2010 06:57 pm
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WilmSurv
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Since the water authority tells me the service pressure is consistent I asked what could be causing the spikes as it could now be something else. I expected and received a second reply explaining what this expert thought and appreciated it. The first time I approached this problem I installed the expansion tank which did not work. This problem came up only after I removed the water softener. Before I make another the expenditure and time implementing a suggestion I like to get all the answers or as we say my ducks in a row. It has been my experience in my professional career that there can be multiple causes and fixes to any situation and I prefer to scientifically work through all of them. I assume from your response once an answer is given do not reword and ask for additional assistance.

Have a fine day!

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 Posted: Mon Sep 20th, 2010 08:21 pm
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elenano
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I may have misunderstood you, but it looked an awful lot like the same question to me.

No matter what the water company says, there could be fluctuations in their pressure. We have logged considerable spikes in our area relating to when they turned their pumps on and off and the utility didn't even know this was causing such spikes.

The question right now though, is, have you installed a pressure reducer to go with your expansion tank? That is the solution to this issue. The reducer will protect you from water company spikes and the expansion tank from thermal expansion.

Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Tue Sep 21st, 2010 02:04 am
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WilmSurv
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That is the direction I am most likely going in just want to be sure I am not fixing it by the process of elimination until I find the culprit...it will be $ I can not rightly afford to spend until I get a full time job again so I am covering all avenues...

Thanks for the advice

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 Posted: Tue Sep 21st, 2010 02:19 am
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elenano
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This economy has been hard on a lot of people. Good luck!

Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Tue Sep 21st, 2010 03:33 pm
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WilmSurv
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Thanks...will let you know how I make out...when I get the reducer...

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 Posted: Tue Sep 21st, 2010 07:39 pm
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LazyDevil
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WilmSurv:

When we moved into our townhouse in 2004, we were plagued with severe water hammer when the washing machine or ice maker valves were actuated. I invested in a cheap pressure meter and put it on an outdoor hose bib. It peaked at 110 psi and never went below 90 psi. Like you, I called our water department and was assured that their pressure was always constant and was between 40 and 65 depending on what part of town the house was located in.

The pressure even popped off a PEX fitting that later was proved to have been incorrectly installed. A few days later, I spoke to a city utility worker who was a few blocks from our house. He said the pressure always moves up and down. He had seen over 125 psi in some parts of town. He pointed out that there was a city water tower a quarter mile from our home, and several companies in a nearby industrial park could cause big fluctuations. He said he had put a pressure reducer in his own home.

I shortly installed a Wilkins, Model 70, Pressure Reducing Valve right next to our water meter. I dropped the 90 to a nice steady 45 psi. The Reducer was only about $50 online, and was simple to install. The water hammer problems disappeared.

For the $50 (plus a few parts) I got two things:
1. Our water use dropped considerably, the same 10 minute shower now used about half as much water. and
2. I sleep much better at night, not worrying about my plumbing's "high blood pressure".

Attachment: PressureReducer.resized.JPG (Downloaded 19 times)

Last edited on Tue Sep 21st, 2010 07:41 pm by LazyDevil

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 Posted: Wed Sep 22nd, 2010 11:08 am
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WilmSurv
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I do not have the hammering just the discharge from my water heater... Since my Water Meter is out in the front yard I have install in the ground...looks like that is what I am going to have to do...it just struck me as odd that it remained consistent except for the spikes and at night when we are not using water... so it has to be the main pressure:cool:

Thanks to all for the responses...

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 Posted: Wed Sep 22nd, 2010 01:18 pm
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energyexpert
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WilmSurv
It sounds like you intend to install the pressure regulator "in the ground at the water meter".  The water meter has nothing to do with the regulator.  Put the pressure regulator at a convenient place in the house before the first water line split/tap and before the first fixture/appliance.  The valves (in toilets, washing machines, etc.) and TPR valves on WHs are most affected by high pressure and piping to a lesser extent.  Placing the pressure regulator usually just after the first cutoff inside the house gives you the most "convenient" protection.  I have seen the first cutoff 8 feet from the wall.  If the pressure regulator is placed as close to the wall as possible in this case, you will protect this additional 7+ feet of piping.  But to install the regulator you have to cut the water off at the street (inconvenient) rather than installing it just after the inside cutoff.

David

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 Posted: Wed Sep 22nd, 2010 01:30 pm
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WilmSurv
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That is interesting and am glad you are telling me this as I saw a video telling you to install in after the water meter. In my case my house is a slab on grade and inside the house there is no place where the pipes are exposed except to the cold line to the water heaters. What I do have is that when we moved in we had a well house which was where the water softener was located, when I ran the line to connect to the county system the line runs into the well house and then out to the house. When I removed the water softener I put a second house shut off in there (the original is underground near my patio and hard to find). So I could install the regulator in that area. What do you think? The line is 1 inch pvc and had been inspected at the time of installation. Does the regulator need to installed in a horizontal or would in work on a vertical pipe?

Thanks for this information...,:dude:

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 Posted: Wed Sep 22nd, 2010 01:55 pm
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energyexpert
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The old well house should be fine.  My regulator is oriented vertical.  I've seen then horizontal.  I don't think it matters.  Just be sure you get the flow going according to the arrow (which most have to show direction of flow).  If the well house plumbing is subject to winter freezing I'd leave a trickle going in a sink at night to prevent freezing.  A brass regulator conducts heat much better than PVC.  So you will develop an ice plug there first if you don't remember to keep a small water flow to prevent freezing.

David

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 Posted: Wed Sep 22nd, 2010 02:10 pm
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WilmSurv
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I here you... I am in Wilmington, North Carolina (South East area) so whenever they predict freezing temps I keep 100 watt light on in the well house and neither the line or the tank for the well have frozen (the well is used for irrigation only).

Thanks a lot.....will let you know  how it goes...

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