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 Posted: Tue May 24th, 2005 12:14 am
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Gordon
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Hi,



I have read ALL of your info on this site but still have a couple ?'s.



1st) How do I know if I need a high altitude water heater or not?



2nd) According to this site you reccomend purchaseing a 6-yr warraty water heater and then spend approx. another hundred dollars or so to modify it and this should give us the equivalent of a 12year warranty or better water heater and should cost less! But what I am seeing is that 6-yr heaters are costing approx $319.00 and up. Then add the $90.00-100.00 for the dip tube, extra anode and valve brings the cost up to $400.00+in which is the cost of 12-yr water heaters my area, SLC, UT. I do realize that buying a 12-yr. unit does not have the curved dip tube (only self cleaning) and ball valve. Have I missed something? :?:

Which brings me to the next Question.



3rd) Do 12-yr units already have 2 anodes? Specifically GE/Rheem or Rheem.



4th) Also, what other units do already have 2 anodes?



Thank you for the oppurtunity,

Gordon

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 Posted: Tue May 24th, 2005 04:53 am
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Gordon
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In my initial post above, I asked, "Have I missed something?"



Something I missed was that the 12-yr warranty models may have only a half length second anode. Since this is better than only one anode, another question comes to mind since the anodes and dip tube will probably last a least 6 years and will need to be replaced at later date any way. Why not buy a water heater with a 12-yr warranty, replace the drain valve as suggested and then replace anodes and dip tube when needed? This way you will initially spend the same as a 6-yr with with modications but with the added plus of having the longer warranty?



-Gordon

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 Posted: Tue May 24th, 2005 08:30 am
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elenano
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You can do it that way, but you're paying more for less. You're paying the premium on the 12-year tank, but maybe only getting a half-length extra anode and no efficient sediment control. You're also presuming that when you get around to changing the dip tube the sediment will easily flush out. That might or might not be the case. Sediment can harden in the bottom of the tank and not come out at all if left too long. And of course, it's not helping your water heater to leave it in the tank for six-plus years.



Another wrinkle, though. Someone recently showed me a spec sheet that indicated that some manufacturers might not offer a 6-year-warranty tank with maximum insulation and that to get it, you might HAVE to buy a 12-year-warranty tank. We'll be keeping an eye on that one.



Naturally, I'd like you to buy stuff from me, but I'd far rather see you buy the 12-year-warranty tank as an alternative, than to see you get a 6-year tank, forget about it and wind up replacing it somewhere down the road. This site is about changing the way people buy and use water heaters more than anything else.



Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Tue May 24th, 2005 03:11 pm
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Gordon
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Hi Randy,

Your points are well taken. The longer it sits the more chnce it will harden.



Can one take a curved style cleaning type dip tube, such as in a GE and cut the very very end off and accomplish the same thing or will this only direct water in too much of a circular motion and not pick up enough sediment off the bottom?

How often would you recommend one to check the anodes? Seems like regular inspection would also help keep fittings from freezing.

Maybe one should also use an old boiler maint. trick of mixing oil & power graphite together to make a paste (anti-seize) to use on certain fitting threads or does teflon tape do just as good?



Thank you,

Gordon

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 Posted: Tue May 24th, 2005 07:04 pm
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elenano
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Are you sure GE's dip tube is curved? The only "self-cleaning" dip tube that I've seen that curved at the bottom was State's and it looked to me that if they had left the end open, it would indeed have worked well for flushing. All the others that I've seen have been straight tubes with holes up and down their length.



As to checking anodes, two to three years unless you soften. In that case, every year.



We don't recommend using anything on the threads that you wouldn't want to drink or bathe in. I'd much rather that be Teflon tape than oil and graphite.



Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Wed May 25th, 2005 04:32 pm
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Gordon
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Hi Randy,

I stand corrected. Must be reading too much info and can't keep it straight.

It was States, their Maytag model. GE's is straight but do claim a type of self cleaning effect.

I also agree about not using anything but tape on fittings wasn't thinking about the side effects of anti-seizes.

Like I say, I have been reading too much and have too much info in which has given me a great deal of indecision on purchasing a new water heater.

One more thing, I'm still looking for guidance on how to determine the necessity of a "high altitude type " of water heater.

I have to tell that site has changed the way I will treat my water heater in the future :!:



Thank you very much,

Gordon

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 Posted: Wed May 25th, 2005 07:17 pm
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elenano
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Gordon,



I have never heard of a high-altitude water heater. Could you elaborate?



Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Wed May 25th, 2005 08:27 pm
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eleent
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Chiming in here: I'm not aware of any high altitude heaters, but heaters are derated for elevation. A heater in Denver will not put out as much hot water as it will in Death Valley. Thinner air having less oxygen for combustion may play a part.



Yours, Larry

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 Posted: Wed May 25th, 2005 11:51 pm
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Gordon
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Randy & Larry,



In my sourcing of W. heaters here SLC, UT I have seen a couple that were stated as high altitude models. One I remember right off was at Lowes.

I have provided a link to their site below. I live at just shy of 5000ft elavation.

-Gordon



http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=7416-135-FG1H5040T3NOV&pad=true

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 Posted: Thu May 26th, 2005 09:00 am
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elenano
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Gordon,



Lowe's clever attempt at "personalizing" the online experience may short-circuit you. I tried the link and wound up at its home page where it asked for my ZIP code so it could provide products specific to my area -- whether I want them or not. I tried just clicking on "water heaters." Back to the home page and ZIP code demand. I have a feeling that even if you gave me the exact link to a specific model, Lowe's might kick me back to that page.



Maybe I'll just e-mail them and ask.....



Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Thu May 26th, 2005 08:04 pm
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Gordon
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Randy,

The link was a direct link to a specific model. I clicked on the link within my post and it did the same thing to me as it did to you.

I have copied & pasted the page below. However the pictures did not make it, so I backspaced the blank areas to shorten the post page length.

-Gordon

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Height is to the top of the vent assembled Whirlpool®

50 Gallon Flame Lock™ Natural Gas Tall High Altitude Water Heater



Item #: 7416 Model: FG1H5040T3NOV

$378.00





Online

Shipping Options include

Lowe's Delivery

In Store

Buy online and pickup at your local Lowe's store: LOWE'S OF SANDY, UT.



High Altitude Model (up to 7000')

50 gallon tank capacity

Suggested for a family of 5

Btu input: 40,000

Recovery rate gph @ 90 degree F rise: 40.5

1" foam tank insulation

9 year warranty



• See Our Rebates

Height: 60.75"

Diameter: 20"

Energy Factor: 0.58

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 Posted: Fri May 27th, 2005 05:22 am
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elenano
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Gordon,



Thank you for providing that information. I expect Larry will have comments. I confess not to know enough to say too much except a couple of things. 1): not enough insulation. One inch is only R-8. If you buy this, you ought to make sure it's R-16 or better. 2): Lowe's only sells American brand, which only uses aluminum anodes, which we don't much like. But I have nothing other to say against American's water heaters. If you like this model, considering replacing the anode or anodes. It will have either one hex or that plus a half-length combo rod in the hot port.



That said, though, it's up to you.



Interesting, I got a "thank you" the other day from someone I sold an anode to a year ago. He said I talked him out of replacing the aluminum anode in his tank with another of the same. He said his daughter had been having skin rashes after showering and they suddenly stopped when he put a magnesium anode in the tank.



I just this moment decided to ask him if I can post it with just his initials in The Tank. Other people ought to be aware of the possibilities.



Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Fri May 27th, 2005 06:53 am
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eleent
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Hello: Regarding high altitude heaters... I think I'd start by knowing how much hot water I needed in an hour. With that number of gallons, I'd get the model numbers of a few heaters that looked promising, then call the manufacturer's tech lines and ask what performance you could expect of their heater at your elevation. I've had very good experiences speaking to the technicians.



Whatever a heater is called, you want it to work in your situation.



Yours, Larry

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