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 Posted: Mon Mar 5th, 2012 08:48 am
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Geno_3245
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http://www.rheem.com/documents/fury-electric-fury-spec-sheet

The Rheem Spec sheet for their new Fury electric water heater product shows some new 'anode' features.
They show anode rod with resistor.
I assume from other answers here that the anode rod is magnesium, and the resistor changes performance level of magnesium to equal performance of aluminum anode rod.

But the spec sheet also shows 'resistored' heating element. Saying this feature 'prolongs life of anode rod.'

How does the resistor anode work?
And how does the resistored element help the anode last longer?

Also bottom of page on same sell sheet is handy formula for calculating water heater recovery for electric water heaters.

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 Posted: Mon Mar 5th, 2012 04:08 pm
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eleent
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Hello:  About the element, just guessing the resistor connects to an isolated element sheath.  That way the anode would "see" a lot less metal to protect and wind up not working so hard.

We know putting a resistor in series with a magnesium anode slows the anode down. I don't know its output current is exactly that of aluminum, but it's likely close.  You can't go much lower and still hope for protection in a variety of waters.  I do know Rheem has played with various resistors to come to what they use now.

On a side note, I ran across a Rheem heater a few days ago that had no relief valve :shock:  It predated manufacturers including relief valves with their heaters.  There was a plastic plug in the T&P port.  I've never seen that before ;)

Yours,  Larry

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 Posted: Mon Mar 5th, 2012 11:41 pm
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Geno_3245
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Thanks for the insight.
The image showing anode rod with resistor does not show the hex head ... is the resistor buried under the head?

Surprising that more water heaters didn't explode back then.
My grandfather repaired steam locomotives, which I assume work same as run-away water heating. Folks back then probably knew about expansion of heated water, but felt hot water was worth the occasional risk.


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 Posted: Tue Mar 6th, 2012 05:55 am
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elenano
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It's under the cap, I think. I do know that is why Rheem anodes have no bump, which is a weld. They crimp them. I assume welding would destroy the resistor.

Randy Schuyler

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 Posted: Tue Mar 6th, 2012 07:00 am
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Geno_3245
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Do you sell a 'resistored' anode?
For me, it is easier to change anodes and not worry if the resistor extends life of tank another year, but I would like to see one of these things up close.

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 Posted: Wed Mar 7th, 2012 12:56 am
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elenano
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No. All mine are normal. Rheem is the only source.

Randy Schuyler

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